Juliana ‘offended' by Patrick Salvado's tribal jokes

Juliana Kanyomozi has admitted feeling offended by jokes made by some Ugandan comedians, including Patrick Salvado.

Juliana Kanyomozi
  • Juliana Kanyomozi feels offended by tribal jokes made by Ugandan comedians, including Patrick Salvado
  • Salvado defended tribal-based jokes as 'inevitable' and part of cultural identity
  • Juliana insisted that comedians should strive not to 'cross certain lines' in their works

Jokes that over-emphasise tribal differences of Ugandans, Juliana says, tend to cross a line.

“I have seen people who are offended by those (tribalistic) jokes, and frankly even I have been offended sometimes when they make fun of Batooro,” she said.

Juliana expressed these concerns during an interview with top Ugandan comedian Salvado in the 8th episode of her “The Sit Down with Juliana” series.

A Mutooro woman by tribe and cousin to the reigning Tooro monarch Oyo Nyimba Kabamba Iguru IV, Juliana expressed her reservations on how so many Ugandan comedians “enjoy making fun” of her tribemates.

Salvado in response, however, defended tribal-based jokes as “inevitable” in all parts of the world.

“In the US, they talk about black and white and racism because that is what they have. If you think we have tribalism, go to Nigeria,” he said.

“It is just inevitable because that is what defines us,” added the comedian, while admitting that “some comedians do go overboard.”

“But the truth of the matter is that Batooro, you are so calm and slow to anger. If I for instance compare you to an Acholi woman, that is where the comedy comes from,” he added

Juliana however, insisted in the interview that comedians should strive not to “cross certain lines” in their works.

Born on November 27, 1980 in Kampala to Prince Gerald Manyindo and Catherine Manyindo, Juliana Kanyomozi grew up in Kampala and went to Bugema Adventist S.S. for senior one, before joining Namasagali College.

Her talent was heritable because her dad loved music and drummed as a pastime.

Kanyomozi became active in music while at Namasagali College where she was encouraged by Father Damian Grimes, who was the school’s headteacher, to join dance class after seeing her sing a Mariah Carey song at a school event.

While in high school, about 16 years old, she started doing karaoke.

Her brother Eddie Kim was a deejay at Sabrina's Pub, which was owned by the producer Hope Mukasa, and it was near where they were living, so he convinced the dad to allow her to start performing there.

In S.6 vacation, she started performing there regularly.

She recorded her first song while in A-Level.

Doing Tata W’abaana with Bobi Wine was a big break for her and they also sang another song titled Mama Mbire, which was also a massive hit.

In S.6 vacation, she also got a job at Capital FM as a radio host and she was there for about six years.

She's also acted in a movie called Kiwani which was created by Henry Ssali, a former Daily Monitor Entertainment writer who now owns a PR firm.

JOIN OUR PULSE COMMUNITY!

Eyewitness? Submit your stories now via social or:

Email: news@pulse.ug

Recommended articles

I would have lost Faridah if I asked for love -Bruno K

I would have lost Faridah if I asked for love -Bruno K

Sheebah announces 2024 concert

Sheebah announces 2024 concert

Pallaso returns to the US after 10 years

Pallaso returns to the US after 10 years

“I worked hard to disprove my dad’ - Abby Mukiibi

“I worked hard to disprove my dad’ - Abby Mukiibi

‘Marriage is out of the question for me’ - Karole Kasita

‘Marriage is out of the question for me’ - Karole Kasita

Photos: Diana Nabatanzi spreads positive vibes in Zanzibar

Photos: Diana Nabatanzi spreads positive vibes in Zanzibar

Exodus starts campaign to fight mental health stigma

Exodus starts campaign to fight mental health stigma

I am now a changed man; a born- again – Grenade

I am now a changed man; a born- again – Grenade

Music is the most profitable business – Gravity

Music is the most profitable business – Gravity